Hampartzoum’s Music Collection

Sara Chitjian’s reflections on Hampartzoum’s Phonograph collection

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The Chitjian Family “Personal” Armenian Record Collection.

Songs from the past to be remembered.

VOLUME 1 (12 records, 26 songs)

Click here to listen to volume 1 (26 songs)

Song List for Volume 1

Commentary / Notes on Armenian Phonographs by Bedros Alahaidoyan

To read an article about Bedros Alahaidoyan, click here

VOLUME 2 (9 records, 18 songs)

Click here to listen to VOLUME 2 (9 records, 18 songs)

Song List for Volume 2

Commentary / Notes on Armenian Phonographs by Bedros Alahaidoyan

VOLUME 3 (10 records, 20 songs)

Click here to listen to VOLUME 3 (10 records, 20 songs)

Song List for Volume 3

Commentary / Notes on Armenian Phonographs by Bedros Alahaidoyan

VOLUME 4 (12 records, 24 songs)

Click here to listen to VOLUME 4 (12 records, 24 songs)

Song List for Volume 4

Commentary / Notes on Armenian Phonographs by Bedros Alahaidoyan

Armenian Revolutionary Songs

Hampartzoum was first taught these patriotic songs from the new principle of his school in Perri when he was 11, 1912-1915 (Page 75 in Hampartzoum’s memoir). The principle was killed shortly thereafter by Ottoman officials.

From Wikipedia: 

Armenian revolutionary songs (Armenian: Հայ յեղափոխական երգեր, Hay heghapokhagan yerker) are songs that promote Armenian patriotism. The origins of these songs lay largely in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when Armenian political parties were established to struggle for the political and civil rights of Armenians living in the Ottoman Empire.

The Armenian revolutionary movement, initially led by the Social Democrat Hunchakian Party (est. 1887) and the Armenian Revolutionary Federation (est. 1890), took place in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.[1] This was caused by years of oppression from the Ottoman Empire, especially under the rule of sultan Abdul Hamid II. This was the period when Armenians began demanding their most basic rights and defending Armenian towns from Ottoman oppression. Certain armed Armenian patriotic groups formed to fight the Turkish oppression and defend Armenian towns from Kurdish brigands. These volunteer fighters were called fedayees. In some instances, they were successful in defending Armenian locals, earning them popular support and elevating them to the status of heroes. This environment was thus ideal for the development of Armenian patriotic songs to support these freedom fighters.[2]

Fedayee Avedis Ghazanjian “Mehshedee Avedoe” (Ismiel, 1868-1915)

About Avedis

Armenian Revolutionary Songs

The Ferrahian Collection & Three Armenian Records

Click here to listen to The Ferrahian Collection (27 songs)

Song List for The Ferrahian Collection & Three Armenian Records

Hampartzoum remembered one Kurdish Song Derek Hoy Hoy

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More About Armenian Music

John Bilezikjian is “America’s Oud Virtuoso” and one of the most prominent Oudist of his generation. His website for more info: www.dantzrecords.com

Ankara Radio Choir Performs Music by Gomidas!

Hampartzoum’s Song

When Hampartzoum purchased his first car in East L.A. he would practice driving late at night after he closed his market. His wife Ovsanna would sit in the front seat and his two kids Zaruhy and Mardig would sit in the back seat. Hampartzoum would sing this song and encouraged everyone to chime in. This outing became a regular occurrence until he became confident in his driving. Zaruhy remembers the experience as spooky because he would drive up in the curvy mountain roads late at night, lit only by the stars and with no other cars around. Zaruhy would think to herself but did not say it out loud, “If something happened, what would we do?”

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The Bear, The Fox and The Wolf

This song is similar to a song Hampartzoum remembers from his child while living in Perri.

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Armenian Instruments